About the artwork
-

Jeroen Boomgaard
-

The Rise

Jeroen Boomgaard
-

(EN) The Rise

Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier, Zurich, 2008

It could be the opening shot of a Hollywood movie. At the beginning of The Rise a man is looking out over the eSouth Axisf which is under construction. Standing in front of a window with his back to us, he stares at the area which the city of Amsterdam dreams will become a new centre that will leave the old, canal ridden and congested space ultimately to tourists. We can not read his gaze, but his stance is instantly reminiscent of the classic cinematic depiction of power and unbridled ambition. The setting aptly sums up the South Axis plans: its showy buildings by top architects such as Vinoly and Ito, and its complete accessibility by motorway, train station and airport, bring together an almost mythic concentration of will and capital in the area that is stretched out at his feet, while the two large vases that flank the window testify that culture is also high on the agenda.
Suddenly we are at another spot. Someone is ascending the staircase that is cut into the facade of one of the office towers. For the rest of the film we follow this man in his endless upward trek. A new stretch to be climbed awaits him at each corner of the building. The structure stretches dizzyingly above him, and although he has already risen to a great height, he doesnft appear to get any closer to the top. Time goes by, he spends the night on a projecting roof somewhere halfway up the building, another day passes, but he does not seem to get anywhere. From time to time he has a brief encounter with the fleeting shadow of a child, and gets involved in a struggle with someone who appears to be his twin. A motorway can be seen in the background, and now and then an aeroplane glides noiselessly past in the sky. But he is isolated in his endless journey to the top.
It is not only the music that is responsible for the unmistakable sense of threat that broods over the film. What the threat is, however, is not immediately clear. When one is dealing with high buildings, endless stairs and the dizzying drops that ensue, doppelgangers and mistaken identities, one immediately thinks of Hitchcockfs Vertigo. But in that film the main characterfs acrophobia is an assignable cause of his traumatic experience, and his falling for the lookalike is driven by desire. However, the anxiety of this stair-climber has no clear cause, it is not even clear what motivates his climb. He seems driven by an exigency without purpose, an ambition without desire. He climbs onward in an almost perfunctory manner, and his anxiety appears to be prompted by the top rather than the abyss below. He is driven on by the fear of never achieving the heights, but perhaps he is filled with anxiety over the void that awaits him there. In his exhausting trek he is the perfect example of the ideal office worker, a subservient member of the expensive-suit proletariat for whom the way to the top is the only option.
Somewhere on his way he enters an office, but it is empty. The man doesnft seem to know what he is looking for, and climbs on further. But we know now that there is nothing going on in this tower, the exterior of which radiates such dynamism and authority. We know that all this haughty steel, glass and concrete conceals only an emptiness in its heart, and that the towerfs own upward drive also stems from a blind desire to reach the top. Thus, as in most of the films by Fischer and el Sani, architecture plays a central role. However, while most of the films deal with the emptiness of buildings which were once charged with ideological or utopian significance, these office towers have not lost their content; their ideal is found exclusively in their exterior. Their main asset is their outward uniqueness, and they regard their height as their greatest virtue. And just as the man no longer has any sense of why he continues to climb the stairs, the office towers of the South Axis have no idea why they are trying to storm the heavens. They press upward out of blind ambition and compete with one another out of hubris.
In what might be the final shot, the man looks over toward the tower opposite him, and there he sees his carbon copy standing in front of the window. The twin he struggled with on the stairs seems suddenly to have defeated him to the top. But what is involved here is not the theme of the doppelganger or the shadow, as this has undermined faith in the human subject since Romanticism; once again, it is about architecture. The uniformity which once was the hallmark of a well-functioning office building, the seriality which guaranteed the efficiency of mass production, has now become a bogey. To the extent that globalisation succeeds better in reducing everything to sameness, emphasis on exceptionality or specificity increasingly becomes a necessity, even if it is just to maintain a suggestion of the concentration and concretion of power. For a long time now the world-encompassing web of cash flows has no longer had booms and busts; everywhere, at the same moment, it can be present or absent in the same way. But, in striving for the top, the building benefits from acting as if it is still intent on some purpose. In doing so it offers a sense of purpose for the workers who, in their eternal trudge upwards, keep the moneyflow treadmill in motion. At the moment their eyes meet, both men realise that the way to the top is also the way down. However, because the film is a loop, they are locked in an eternal struggle for the top without a chance of escape. There is more involved here than simply a feint that the threat is real. The office towers that confront one another in the South Axis stand for quality and culture. But at the moment when they reflect each other, they see the vacuum of their hollow pride. As stiff soldiers of capitalism, they lose all their lustre and heroism; only with difficulty can they carry out their commission. They are twins in the depths of their empty souls.

↑ Back

Jeroen Boomgaard
-

(DE) The Rise

Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier, Zurich, 2008

Es konnte die Anfangsszene eines Hollywoodfilms sein. Zu Beginn von The Rise (Der Aufstieg) sieht ein Mann aus dem Fenster und inspiziert die im Bau befindliche eSudachsef. Er steht mit dem Rucken zu uns und starrt auf ein Gebiet, in dem sich die Stadt Amsterdam ein neues Zentrum ertraumt, das den alten, kanaldurchzogenen und ubervolkerten Bereich der Stadt endgultig den Touristen uberlasst. Seine Augen konnen wir nicht sehen, aber seine Korperhaltung erinnert sofort an die klassische filmische Darstellung von Macht und grenzenlosem Ehrgeiz. Die Szene resumiert treffend die Sud-achsenplane: Protzige Gebaude von Toparchitekten wie Vinoly und Ito und ihre totale Verkehrsanbindung an Autobahn, Bahnhof und Flughafen erzeugen in diesem Gebiet eine fast mythische Konzentration von Willenskraft und Kapital, die sich zu Fusen des Protagonisten erstreckt, wahrend die zwei grosen Vasen, die das Fenster flankieren, belegen, dass auch Kultur weit oben auf der Tagesordnung steht. Wir erleben einen plotzlichen Ortswechsel. Jemand erklimmt eine Treppe, die in die Ausenhulle eines Buroturms eingelassen ist. Den Rest des Films folgen wir diesem Mann auf seinem endlosen Weg. An jeder Ecke des Gebaudes erwartet ihn wieder ein neuer Treppenabschnitt. Schwindelerregend erhebt sich das Bauwerk uber ihm und obwohl er bereits eine grose Hohe erreicht hat, scheint er sich der Spitze in keiner Weise zu nahern. Die Zeit vergeht, er verbringt die Nacht auf einem Dachvorsprung irgendwo auf halber Hohe, ein weiterer Tag verstreicht, aber der Mann scheint nicht voranzukommen. Ab und zu begegnet er kurz dem fliehenden Schatten eines Kindes oder wird in einen Kampf mit einer Gestalt verwickelt, die sein Zwilling zu sein scheint. Im Hintergrund ist eine Autobahn zu sehen und gelegentlich schwebt am Himmel lautlos ein Flugzeug vorbei. Aber auf seinem endlosen Weg zur Spitze ist der Mann vollig von der Welt abgeschnitten.
Nicht nur die Musik ist fur das deutliche Gefuhl der Bedrohung verantwortlich, das den Film durchzieht. Allerdings ist nicht gleich klar, worin die Bedrohung besteht. Hohe Gebaude, endlose Treppen und damit verbundene schwindelerregende Hohen, Doppelganger und Verwechslungen lassen einen sofort an Hitchcocks Vertigo ? Aus dem Reich der Toten denken. Aber dort hat die Hohenangst des Protagonisten ihre bestimmbare Ursache in einem traumatischen Erlebnis, wahrend seine Gefuhle fur die Doppelgangerin von sinnlichem Verlangen bestimmt sind. Fur die Angst des Treppensteigers gibt es hingegen keine nachvollziehbare Ursache und auch der Grund, warum er nach oben strebt, bleibt unklar. Er scheint von einem ziellosen Drang, von unmotiviertem Ehrgeiz getrieben zu sein. Fast nachlassig wirkt sein Klettern und seine Angst scheint eher von dem vor ihm liegenden Ziel ausgelost zu sein als vom unter ihm klaffenden Abgrund. Die Furcht, den Aufstieg nicht zu bewaltigen, treibt ihn voran, aber vielleicht erfullt ihn auch Angst vor der Leere, die ihn oben erwartet. So, wie er sich abplagt, liefert er das Idealbeispiel fur den perfekten Buroangestellten; er ist ein willfahriger Angehoriger des Anzugproletariats, fur den der Aufstieg an die Spitze die einzig mogliche Option darstellt.

Irgendwo unterwegs betritt unser Protagonist ein Buro, das jedoch leer steht. Er scheint nicht zu wissen, wonach er sucht und klettert weiter. Wir jedoch wissen jetzt, dass in diesem Turm, dessen Auseres Dynamik und Autoritat ausstrahlt, nichts passiert. Wir wissen, dass all der stolze Stahl, das Glas und der Beton nur die Leere in seinem Herzen verbergen und dass der Trieb des Turms selbst gen Himmel auch von einem blinden Verlangen herruhrt, die Spitze zu erreichen. Somit ist Architektur, wie in den meisten Filmen von Fischer und el Sani, auch hier von zentraler Bedeutung. Aber wahrend sie sich meist mit der Leere von Gebauden befassen, die einst mit ideologischer oder utopischer Bedeutung aufgeladen waren, haben diese Buroturme ihren Inhalt nicht verloren: das Ideal findet sich vielmehr ausschlieslich in ihrem Auseren. Ihren grosten Vorzug sehen sie in ihrer auseren Einzigartigkeit und ihrer Hohe. Und so wie der Mann keine Vorstellung mehr davon hat, warum er den Stufen weiter nach oben folgt, haben auch die Buroturme der Sudachse keine Vorstellung, warum sie die Himmel zu sturmen versuchen. Aus blindem Eifer streben sie nach oben, konkurrieren sie hochmutig miteinander.
In einer Szene, die die Schlusseinstellung sein konnte, schaut der Mann auf der Treppe zum Turm gegenuber und sieht dort sein Abziehbild am Fenster stehen. Der Zwilling, mit dem er auf der Treppe gekampft hatte, scheint den Weg nach oben plotzlich als Erster geschafft zu haben. Aber hier geht es nicht um das Doppelganger- oder Schattenthema, das seit der Romantik den Glauben an das menschliche Individuum erschuttert; einmal mehr geht es um Architektur. Die Einheitlichkeit, die einst fur ein gut funktionierendes Burogebaude stand, die Serienherstellung, die die Effizienz der Massenproduktion gewahrleistete, ist nunmehr zum Schreckgespenst geworden. In dem Mase, in dem die Globalisierung umso erfolgreicher funktioniert, wenn sie alles auf den kleinsten gemeinsamen Nenner reduziert, wird es zunehmend zur Notwendigkeit, das Augenmerk auf das Ausergewohnliche und Besondere zu richten, und sei es nur, um die Idee der Konzentration und Verschmelzung von Macht aufrechtzuerhalten. Das weltumspannende Netz der Geldstrome erlebt keine Hohen und Tiefen mehr; es kann uberall gleichzeitig und gleichermasen vorhanden oder abwesend sein. Aber es profitiert davon, so zu tun, als sei es zweckgerichtet und strebe an die Spitze. Dadurch gibt es Arbeitern und Angestellten einen Sinn im Leben, die mit ihrem ewigen Marsch nach oben die Tretmuhle und damit den Geldstrom in Bewegung halten. In dem Moment, wenn sich ihre Blicke begegnen, realisieren die beiden Manner, dass der Weg an die Spitze gleichzeitig auch nach unten fuhrt. Aber weil der Film eine Schleife ist, sind sie im ewigen Kampf um den Spitzenplatz gefangen, ohne auch nur die geringste Chance zur Flucht zu haben.
Es geht hier um mehr als um blose Simulation ? es geht um eine reale Gefahr. Die sich gegenuberstehenden Buroturme auf der Sudachse symbolisieren Qualitat und Kultur. Aber wenn sie sich ineinander spiegeln, blicken sie in die Leere ihres hohlen Stolzes. Als hartnackige Soldaten des Kapitalismus verlieren sie all ihren Glanz und ihre Heldenhaftigkeit; nur unter Schwierigkeiten konnen sie ihren Auftrag erfullen. Tief in ihren leeren Seelen gleichen sie sich wie ein Ei dem anderen.

↑ Back

Back to Top