About the artwork
-

Jelle Bouwhuis
-

A Space Formerly Known as a Museum

Jelle Bouwhuis
-

(EN) A Space Formerly Known as a Museum

Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier,
Zurich, 2008

A Space Formerly Known as a Museum consists of ten photographs taken in March 2007 in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. The photographs document the state of the museumfs interior at a moment when the building had been gutted to make way for renovation. Not only had the artworks been removed, but so too had the fake walls, timberwork, ceiling covers and floors ? the essential structure of the neo-renaissance edifice had become visible again for the first time since the museum opened its doors in 1895. In this state, one had a clear view of the Gallery of Honor on the first floor (photograph no. 10), and the smaller rooms and cabinets that are grouped symmetrically around a central staircase and connected by long enfilades. The skylight structure was shown to complete the beautiful blend of steel, brick and concrete that was characteristic of late nineteenth-century building techniques.
Fischer and el Sanifs photographs reveal that the walls of the galleries must have been covered with plaster and different coloured wallpapers, and traces of the wainscots which once clad the walls can be seen in some of the images. Rectangular slabs on the floor indicate the heating outlets, where enormous sofas were once situated. It was around 1938 that Willem Sandberg, who later became the museumfs most famous director, had all these elements removed to cover the walls with white textile. This ewhitecubisationf of the former bourgeois epalacef marked the beginning of the history of the Stedelijk as a truly modernist museum.
For their inventory of the desolated interior of the museum, Fischer and el Sani rely on the oldest function of photography: to document. Such directness resembles the attitudes of Blossfeldt, Renger-Patzsch or the Becher duo, to name just a few renowned German predecessors. But their focus on the museumfs ruinous state recalls the work on the Palace of the Republic in Berlin. The demolition of that model building symbolised the scale with which the promise of a socialist utopia, crystallised in modernist form, was broken completely. In contrast, the de-idealisation of the modernist museum has been such a slow and inadvertent process that one cannot even be sure if it has happened at all. From its beginning the Stedelijk housed private collections, exhibited in nineteenth-century salon style but also in period rooms and historical cabinets; once it even housed Rembrandtfs Nightwatch. Under the direction of Sandberg it began to develop a Bauhaus attitude. Its modernist phase reached maturity after the Second World War with the acquisition of a large body of works by Malevich in 1958, and reached its apotheosis towards the end of the 1970s. For example, a typical view of the Honor Gallery under director Edy de Wilde included large colour field paintings by Barnett Newman, of whose work he had acquired the largest collection in Europe, as well as works by Ellsworth Kelly and Morris Louis. With respect to other signs of modernisation, such as the rectangular doorways which once must have been arches, it is also tempting to consider the abstract stains and paint patterns on the walls as residues of the museumfs modernist history ? a history determined by numerous shows of abstract painting, including examples from the collection itself. This type of archeological presentation alludes to an older work by Fischer and el Sani, Aura Research (1998-2005). For this project the artists photographed interiors of abandoned but preserved houses and spaces and displayed them next to so-called Kirlian photos taken at the same spot. The Kirlian photographic method was developed by the Russian Semyon Kirlian at the end of the 1930s and was presumed to capture the otherwise invisible auras of bodies and objects. As Boris Groys wrote of this project, the aura photos resist Benjaminfs hypothesis that a reproduction lacks the aura of the original. Instead, he argues, the artists create auras simply by documenting the empty rooms they visit.1 But he also refers to earlier aura theories in theosophical circles around 1900. These theories greatly influenced the first generation of abstract painters, among them Kandinsky and Mondrian.
The patterns on the stripped walls cover the whole history of this early auratic phase of abstraction up to the period when colour field painting reigned over the institution. And still, even after this High Modernist period, further contemporary manifestations of abstraction have held the museum under their spell, as can be understood through Niele Toronifs pyramid of small squares painted on the ceiling over the staircase gallery in 1994, visible in photograph no. 9. Toronifs wall painting aptly resonates with the series of unadorned holes which exist in the plasterwork of some of the walls (no. 7). Elsewhere the stripes on the walls (no. 6 and no. 7) bring to mind Daniel Burenfs intervention of 1982 on the ground floor of the building. The marks in photograph no. 6 are obscure but resemble Malevichfs set sketches for the theatre play Victory over the Sun, from which he derived his Black Square painting of 1914.
The layers of time revealed through the overhaul of the Stedelijkfs interior bring to mind the small gesture of Pierre Huyghe in which he gouged a hole from one of the walls of the Secession in Vienna in 1999. Appearing as a series of concentric rings, his work exposed an accumulation of layers, works and period styles. Considering the general deprivation of the museumfs identity as it is shown in the photographs, one rather thinks of a completely different kind of intervention, such as that which Santiago Sierra carried out at Museum DfHondt DfHaenens in Belgium in 2004. There he startled visitors by removing all of the windows from the museum building. The comparable temporary makeover of the Stedelijk turns the museum into any kind of building. For example, it could be an old industrial complex or even a palace after the revolution. As a matter of fact, it looks exactly like the type of building that perfectly suits todayfs demands of institutes of contemporary art, as can be found in abundance all over Europe ? not because of socialist agendas, as was the case in Sandbergfs time, but mostly for the purposes of city marketing and gentrification.
A Space Formerly Known as a Museum thus documents more than a century of museum history, from the bourgeois palace of artifacts to the modernist white cube, to the capitalised Cultural Institute. On first reading, the title of Fischer and el Sanifs work may only refer to the temporary, unrecognisable state of the museum, but in fact it also questions the term emuseumf, and its altering meanings and intentions through a meandering societal context. One suspects that in the end the aura of the museum as preserved in these photographs offers the most accurate definiti on of it. Note

1. See Boris Groys, eThe Aura of Profane Enlightenmentf, in The World (maybe) Fantastic, exh. cat., Sydney Biennale, 2002, pp.78-79

↑ Back

Jelle Bouwhuis
-

(DE) A Space Formerly Known as a Museum

Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier,
Zurich, 2008

A Space Formerly Known as a Museum (Ein Ort, der einst als Museum bekannt war) besteht aus 10 Fotografien, die im Marz 2007 im Stedelijk-Museum in Amsterdam aufgenommen wurden. Sie dokumentieren die Situation im Inneren des Museums zu jener Zeit, als das Gebaude bereits verlassen war, die Renovierungsarbeiten jedoch noch nicht begonnen hatten. Die Fotos zeigen, dass nicht nur die Kunst abtransportiert worden war; auch Stellwande, Gebalk, Deckenverkleidungen und Fusboden waren bereits entfernt, so dass seit der Eroffnung des Museums im Jahr 1895 zum ersten Mal wieder die Grundstruktur des Neorenaissancegebaudes sichtbar wurde. Jetzt kann man deutlich die Ehrengalerie im ersten Stock (Fotografie no. 10) und kleinere Raume und Kammern sehen, die alle symmetrisch um eine Treppe in der Mitte gruppiert und durch lange Enfiladen miteinander verbunden sind. Die Konstruktion der Dachfenster rundet die wunderbare, fur die Bauweise des ausgehenden 19. Jahrhunderts charakteristische Mixtur aus Stahl, Backstein und Beton ab.
In der Vergangenheit mussen die Galeriewande mit Stuck und Tapete in ausgesuchten Farben verkleidet gewesen sein und mit Sicherheit gab es uberall Tafelungen. Bunte Stuckreste sind auf Fischer und el Sanis Fotos in Hulle und Fulle vorhanden und auf einigen von ihnen kann man Uberreste der Paneele erkennen. Rechteckige Platten auf dem Boden markieren die Heizungsoffnungen. Auf ihnen standen einst riesige Sofas. Um 1938 lies Willem Sandberg, der spater der beruhmteste Direktor des Museums wurde, alles entfernen und stattdessen die Wande mit weisem Stoff bespannen. Mit dieser ?Whitecubisierunge des einstigen Burgerpalastes begann die Geschichte des Stedelijk als wirkliches Museum der Moderne.
Fur ihre Inventaraufstellung der verlassenen Museumsraume vertrauen Fischer und el Sani auf den altesten Zweck des Mediums Fotografie: zu dokumentieren. Ihre Geradlinigkeit erinnert an die Herangehensweise Blossfeldts, Renger- Patzschs oder des Becher-Duos, um nur einige ihrer beruhmten deutschen Vorganger zu nennen. Dass sie den Schwerpunkt auf den verfallenen Zustand des Museums legen, lasst aber auch an die Arbeit zum Palast der Republik in Berlin denken. Die Zerstorung dieses Vorzeigebaus symbolisiert Furcht und Schrecken, mit denen einhergehend die Verheisung einer machbaren sozialistischen Utopie, in modernistische Form gegossen, vollends vernichtet wurde. Im Vergleich dazu war die Entidealisierung des modernen Museums ein langsamer und schleichender Prozess, wobei man sich nicht einmal sicher sein kann, dass er uberhaupt stattgefunden hat.
Anfangs beherbergte das Stedelijk- Museum Privatsammlungen, die im Salonstil des 19. Jahrhunderts, aber auch in antiken Raumen und historischen Kammern prasentiert wurden; eine Zeit lang war hier sogar Rembrandts Nachtwache zu Hause. Mit Sandberg hielt das Bauhauskonzept Einzug. Die modernistische Phase nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg nahm 1958 mit dem Erwerb einer grosen Anzahl von Werken Malewitschs Gestalt an und erreichte gegen Ende der Siebzigerjahre ihren Hohepunkt. Unter dem damaligen Direktor Edy de Wilde waren beispielsweise die Bilder von Barnett Newman mit ihren grosformatigen Farbflachen ein typischer Anblick. De Wilde hatte die groste Sammlung von Newman-Werken in ganz Europa erworben, auserdem Arbeiten von Ellsworth Kelly und Morris Louis.
Analog zu anderen Anzeichen von Modernisierung, wie beispielsweise rechteckigen Turaussparungen die einst bogenformig gewesen sein mussen, ist man versucht, die abstrakten Flecken und Farbmuster an den Wanden ebenfalls als Uberbleibsel der modernistischen Geschichte des Museums anzu-sehen ? einer in zahlreichen Ausstellungen und einer Sammlung mit hauptsachlich abstrakten Gemalden verdichteten Geschichte. Eine derartige Archaologie des Ortes erinnert an eine altere Arbeit von Fischer und el Sani, an Aura Research (Auraforschung; 1998-2005). Fur dieses Projekt fotografierte das Kunstlerpaar verlassene, aber gut erhaltene Raume und Hauser und stellte sie am gleichen Ort aufgenommenen, sogenannten Kirlianfotografien gegenuber. Mit diesem Ende der Dreisigerjahre von dem Russen Semjon Kirlian entwickelten fotografischen Verfahren soll es angeblich moglich sein, die ansonsten unsichtbare Aura von Lebewesen und Gegenstanden zu erfassen. Wie Boris Groys uber dieses Projekt schrieb, widersetzen sich die Aura-Fotos Benjamins Hypothese, einer Reproduktion fehle die Aura des Originals. Stattdessen, so argumentiert er geistreich, erzeugen die Kunstler selbst jene Auren, indem sie die leeren Raume aufsuchen.1 Groys nimmt aber auch Bezug auf fruhere Aura-Theorien theosophischer Zirkel um 1900. Diese Theorien beeinflussten masgeblich die erste Generation abstrakter Maler, unter ihnen Kandinsky und Mondrian.
Die Muster auf den entblosten Wanden bezeugen die gesamte Geschichte dieser fruhen, auratischen Phase der Abstraktion bis hin zu jener Periode, in der Farbfeldmalerei die Institutionen beherrschte. Und noch nach dieser Hoch- Zeit der Moderne standen Museen unter dem Bann neuerer Abstraktionsmanifestationen, wie man aus Niele Toronis Pyramide aus kleinen Quadraten schliesen kann, die 1994 uber der Treppengalerie an die Decke gemalt worden war, zu sehen auf Fotografie no. 9. Das Werk von Toroni hallt sehr anschaulich in den regelmasig angeordneten Lochern im Stuck der verschiedenen Wande wider (no. 7). An anderer Stelle erinnern die Streifen an den Wanden (no. 6 und no. 7) an Daniel Burens Intervention von 1982 im Erdgeschoss des Gebaudes. Der Ursprung der Zeichnung auf Foto no. 6 ist unklar, aber sie ahnelt den Skizzen Malewitschs fur das Buhnenbild des Theaterstucks Sieg uber die Sonne, auf denen sein Gemalde Schwarzes Quadrat von 1914 beruhte.
Wie hier im Stedelijk-Museum die Zeitebenen ans Licht kommen, lasst an die kleine Geste Pierre Huyghes denken, der 1999 ein zylinderformiges Loch in eine der Wande der Secession in Wien bohrte und so eine Ansammlung von Farbschichten, Werktechniken und Stilrichtungen freilegte. Zieht man jedoch den auf den Fotografien sichtbaren, allgemeinen Identitatsverlust des Museums in Betracht, kommt einem eher eine vollig andere Art von Intervention in den Sinn, etwa jene, die Santiago Sierra 2004 im Museum DfHondt DfHaenens in Belgien durchfuhrte. Dort hatte er alle Fenster des Museumsgebaudes entfernt und es in diesem Zustand dem verblufften Publikum prasentiert. Der vergleichbare (und vorubergehende) Umbau des Stedelijk macht das Museum zu einem beliebigen Gebaude. Es konnte beispielsweise ein alter Industriekomplex oder sogar ein Palast nach der Revolution sein. In der Tat scheint es perfekt den heutigen Anforderungen an eine Institution fur zeitgenossische Kunst zu entsprechen, wie man sie uberall in Europa im Uberfluss findet ? nicht aus sozialistischen Motiven wie zu Sandbergs Zeiten, sondern hauptsachlich aus Grunden von Marketing und Gentrifizierung.
So dokumentiert A Space Formerly Known as a Museum mehr als einfach nur ein Jahrhundert Museumsgeschichte, mehr als die Entwicklung vom Burgerpalast der Artefakte uber den modernistischen White Cube hin zur kapitalistisch ausgerichteten Kultureinrichtung. Auf den ersten Blick mag Fischer und el Sanis Arbeit den vorubergehend entblosten Zustand des Museums abbilden. In Wirklichkeit aber hinterfragt sie den Begriff ?Museume und seine wechselnden Bedeutungen und Absichten im komplexen gesellschaftlichen Kontext. Es keimt der Verdacht auf, die auf den Fotografien festgehaltene Museumsaura biete letzten Endes die exakteste Definition des Begriffs. Notiz

1. Siehe Boris Groys, ?The Aura of Profane Enlightenmente im Ausstellungskatalog The World (maybe) Fantastic zur Sydney-Biennale 2002, S. 78-79

↑ Back

Back to Top