Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani  
 

Projects

Publications & Texts Curriculum Vitae Gallery Contact Imprint  
    Selected Catalogues        
    Texts          
               
     
     
  About the artwork
About the artists
Hou Hanru
Catching the Zeitgeist
xoo – ex ovo omnia
Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier, Zurich, 2008   pdf
Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani
xoo - ex ovo omnia
Berlin, 2006    pdf
 

Hou Hanru

Catching the Zeitgeist
xoo – ex ovo omnia
Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier, Zurich, 2008

Nina Fischer and Maroan el Sani’s work is a permanent pursuit of and negotiation with the transition of time, or the transition of epochs, that has marked the very zeitgeist of our post-Cold War and global capitalist age. They explore the historic traces of urban landmarks, monuments and events that embody such a transition. Their work critically demonstrates the rise and fall of modernity, the intense and uncanny relationship between our contemporary society and utopian projects that have driven the evolution of our history, from the past to the future, or the anachronistic merging of both ends.
Having experienced first hand the fall of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Germany, the artists have been systematically focusing their attention and imagination on the contradictory effects of such a transition. The transformed urban and architectural spaces in East Berlin that most visibly incarnate this crucial event have become the very sites of their investigation and creation. Locations that particularly attract their attention are those which stand to highlight the socialist construction of the German Democratic Republic such as the Palace of the Republic, the East Berlin Radio Station and the meeting places of the subculture such as underground clubs, often abandoned and facing gentrification projects today. However, instead of focusing on the overwhelming monumentality and sublime aesthetic forms of these dramatic edifices, Fischer and el Sani prefer to penetrate into the internal worlds of the spaces, which are rapidly being reduced, emptied and even demolished under the pressure of privatisation. There remains a spirit that haunts these sites, whether they are destroyed or completely transformed. This very spirit, the Geist, the mysterious carrier of past events and memory, is exactly what the artists look to capture and make visible through their work.
Modernist buildings that once promised a utopian future provide new territories for many artists, architects and theoreticians. Fischer and el Sani continue in their efforts to investigate and question the nature of ‘utopia’, and the inevitable futility of these ghost-like monuments. Their research is not limited to the borders of former East Berlin. In some of their recent works they have shifted their attention to a considerably different but equally intensive site of geopolitical transition: Paris. And this shift opens up a new space in which they can further explore the fate of ‘utopia’ as a universal concern. This is particularly meaningful in our time as we struggle to probe the myths of globalisation.
Spending months in the French capital, they invested their energy and imagination in exploring two important sites that have undergone an equally important transformation: the old Bibliothèque Nationale and the headquarters of the French Communist Party (PCF). The latter building experienced a similar fate to that of the Palace of the Republic in Berlin. It is a UFO-like modernist masterpiece, a beautiful and audacious symbol of communist idealism. It was designed by Oscar Niemeyer while living in exile in Paris soon after he had fled the Brazilian dictatorship. The PCF commission was started in 1965 but the building was not finished until 1980, by which time the party had dramatically decreased in popularity. Now the building is occasionally rented out to transnational corporations to stage events such as fashion shows. Fischer and el Sani exploited this highly symbolic site, once again, to set up a scenario of a haunting ghost movie, which reveals the legacy of its ‘utopia’, its rise and fall. Clearly, the site represents a kind of hardwon utopia in the heart of this western capital which is facing the same gentrification as anywhere. And this gentrification is one of the clearest signs of the globalisation of the freemarket economy, namely late capitalism, which is in itself a curious mixture of utopianism and cynicism. As John Ralston Saul points out, globalisation, or its philosophy (globalism), purporting to be economically inevitable, is in fact another form of ideology, a disguised one that is ruling the world in a violent but efficient way when other ideologies are abandoned.1
xoo – ex ovo omnia is an ambitious series of video and photographic works developed to understand the complex structure of the PCF. If the destiny of the PCF and its headquarters, in trying to survive the wave of late capitalism and social cynicism of today, is to embody both physically and spiritually a common struggle for many in our time to maintain a sense of the meaning of life, then the artists’ intervention becomes even more significant. They introduced a new perspective to their work – they staged a science-fiction performance. ‘The white concrete dome is the site of an unusual experiment: two actors in white protection suits are concentrating on lining up raw eggs on the white conference tables. The task requires a calm hand, great patience and an understanding of complex structures such as the architecture of an egg … We were drawn to the building’s futuristic shape which allows us to look into the future from the standpoint of the past.’
This bizarre, swift, phantom-like appearance of the two performers, who are dressed completely in white and against a white background, provokes a feeling of suspicion. And we ask: Where are we? Why are we here? Is it the real world? Or are we on an unknown planet? Perhaps it is in this moment of uncertain inquiry that the power of this utopian building, indeed of any utopian project, can be expressed. By its nature, utopia is unrealisable. But, like a Geist that continually returns, it always haunts our lives. Is it a ghost of Malevich’s White On White, a truly revolutionary painting? Or can our time still be related to it at all? In either case, Nina Fischer and Maroan el Sani are the catchers of our zeitgeist.

Note
1. John Ralston Saul, The Collapse of Globalism and the Reinvention of the World, Atlantic, London 2005.
 
 

Hou Hanru

Den Zeitgeist einfangen
xoo – ex ovo omnia
Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, Katalog, JRP-Rignier, Zürich, 2008

Nina Fischer und Maroan el Sanis Werk ist eine fortwährende Beschäftigung und Auseinandersetzung mit den Übergängen zwischen Zeiten und Epochen, die den Zeitgeist unserer vom globalen Kapitalismus geprägten Ära nach dem Kalten Krieg kennzeichnen. Sie wandeln auf den historischen Spuren urbaner Orientierungspunkte, Denkmäler und Ereignisse, die einen derartigen Übergang verkörpern, und verdeutlichen so den Aufstieg und Fall der Moderne oder die enge und doch unheimliche Beziehung zwischen unserer gegenwärtigen Gesellschaft und utopischen Projekten, die den Lauf der Geschichte aus der Vergangenheit heraus bis in die Zukunft hinein vorangetrieben haben, oder die anachronistische Verschmelzung beider Enden.
Die Künstler haben den Fall der Berliner Mauer und die Wiedervereinigung Deutschlands unmittelbar miterlebt und richten ihre Aufmerksamkeit und Vorstellungskraft systematisch auf die Frage nach den Widersprüchlichkeiten, die mit einer derartigen historischen Umwälzung einhergehen. Die Veränderung urbaner und architektonischer Räume im Ostteil der Stadt stellt die sichtbarste und deutlichste Folge dieses Schlüsselereignisses dar, und genau hier waren die beiden investigativ und schöpferisch tätig. Besonders jene Orte, die die Höhepunkte sozialistischer Baukunst in der DDR darstellten – wie der Palast der Republik oder das Gebäude des DDR-Rundfunkzentrums in Ost-Berlin –, und die Treffpunkte der Subkultur, wie beispielsweise die Underground-Klubs erregen ihre Aufmerksamkeit; Orte, die heute oft verlassen und in Gefahr sind, Gentrifizierungsprojekten weichen zu müssen.
Statt sich allerdings von der Monumentalität, den erhabenen ästhetischen Formen und dem dramatischen Schicksal der Gebäude überwältigen zu lassen, dringen die beiden Künstler lieber in das Innenleben der Räume vor, die unter dem Druck der Privatisierung urbaner Räume in rasender Geschwindigkeit dezimiert, entkernt und sogar abgerissen werden. Diese Stätten werden jedoch immer von einer Art Geist heimgesucht, auch wenn sie zerstört oder vollkommen transformiert werden. Es ist eben dieser geheimnisvolle Geist der Vergangenheit, der Erinnerung, der Geschichte, den Fischer und el Sani in ihrer künstlerischen Arbeit einfangen und sichtbar machen wollen.
Die modernistischen Gebäude, die einst eine Utopie versprachen, bieten vielen Künstlern, Architekten und Theoretikern ein neues Terrain – unter ihnen auch Fischer und el Sani, die mit ihren Bemühungen fortfahren, das Wesen der Utopie und deren gespenstisch-absurde Unvermeidbarkeit zu erforschen und infrage zu stellen. Ihre künstlerische Forschungsarbeit bleibt nicht auf das einstige Ost-Berlin beschränkt. In einigen ihrer jüngsten Werke haben sie die Aufmerksamkeit auf einen ganz anderen, aber gleichermaßen beziehungsreichen Ort des geopolitischen Übergangs verlagert: auf Paris. Und diese Verlagerung eröffnet ihnen einen neuen Raum, in dem sie das Schicksal der Utopie als universelles Thema weiter erforschen können. In unserer Zeit, in der wir alle Anstrengungen unternehmen, die Mythen der Globalisierung zu durchdringen, ist dies besonders bedeutsam.
Während mehrerer Monate, die sie in dieser westeuropäischen Hauptstadt verbrachten, verwendeten die beiden Künstler ihre Energie und Vorstellungskraft darauf, zwei wichtige Stätten zu erforschen, die einer ebenso bedeutsamen Verwandlung unterworfen waren: die alte Bibliothèque Nationale und die Zentrale der Kommunistischen Partei Frankreichs (PCF). Letztere teilt in gewisser Hinsicht mit dem Berliner Palast der Republik ein gemeinsames Schicksal. Sie ist ein modernistisches Meisterwerk, das wie ein UFO aussieht, ein schönes und kühnes Symbol des kommunistischen Idealismus. Der Entwurf stammt von Oscar Niemeyer und entstand kurz nach dessen Flucht vor der brasilianischen Diktatur ins Exil nach Paris. Der Auftragsbau der PCF wurde zwar bereits 1965 begonnen, jedoch erst 1980 fertiggestellt, als die Partei bereits einen gravierenden Popularitätsschwund zu verzeichnen hatte. Jetzt wird das Gebäude gelegentlich für Veranstaltungen wie Modenschauen an multinationale, kapitalistische Unternehmen vermietet. Einmal mehr nutzten Fischer und el Sani diese höchst symbolische Stätte als Kulisse für einen ,Gespensterfilm‘, der das Schicksal der Utopie, ihren Aufstieg und Fall offenbart. Im Herzen von Paris repräsentiert dieser Ort deutlich gerade die Art von hart erkämpfter Utopie, die gegenwärtig allenthalben der Gentrifizierung ausgesetzt ist. Und diese Gentrifizierung ist eines der offensichtlichsten Symptome der globalisierten freien Marktwirtschaft, des Spätkapitalismus, der selbst eine eigenartige Mischung aus Utopismus und Zynismus ist. Wie John Ralston Saul anmerkt, ist Globalisierung oder die ihr zugrunde liegende Philosophie (der Globalismus), die behauptet, es handele sich hierbei um eine zwangsläufige wirtschaftliche Entwicklung, in Wirklichkeit auch nur eine Form verhüllter Ideologie, die die Welt aggressiv, aber auf effiziente Weise beherrscht, wo andere Ideologien ausgedient haben.1
xoo – ex ovo omnia besteht aus einem Videofilm und einer Reihe von Fotografien, die dabei helfen sollen, die komplexe Struktur der PCF zu verstehen. Wenn es das Schicksal der Partei und ihrer Zentrale ist, mit ihrem Überlebenskampf in der heutigen vom Spätkapitalismus und sozialen Zynismus geprägten Zeit sowohl physisch als auch moralisch dem Kampf Vieler Ausdruck zu verleihen, die Sinn für ihr Leben reklamieren, verleiht dies der künstlerischen Intervention zusätzliche Bedeutsamkeit. Die beiden Künstler führten eine neue Perspektive in ihr Werk ein: Sie inszenierten eine futuristische Performance. „Die weiße Betonkuppel ist Schauplatz eines ungewöhnlichen Experiments: Zwei Schauspieler in weißen Schutzanzügen verwenden ihre ganze Konzentration darauf, auf den ebenfalls weißen Konferenztischen rohe Eier in Reihen anzuordnen. Die Aufgabe erfordert eine ruhige Hand, große Geduld und ein Verständnis komplexer Strukturen, wie das Ei eine ist … Wir waren von der futuristischen Form des Gebäudes fasziniert, die uns gestattet, aus der Vergangenheit heraus in die Zukunft zu blicken.“
Dieser bizarre, flüchtige, absurde, phantomartige Auftritt der Darsteller, ganz in Weiß und vor einem weißen Hintergrund agierend, weckt ein bemerkenswertes Gefühl des Misstrauens. Es lässt uns fragen: Wo sind wir? Warum sind wir hier? Ist dies die reale Welt? Oder befinden wir uns auf einem fremden Planeten? Vielleicht kann in einem derart unsicheren Moment des Hinterfragens die Kraft dieser utopischen Architektur und damit jedes utopischen Projekts am besten zum Ausdruck gebracht werden. Die Utopie ist ihrem Wesen nach nicht realisierbar. Aber wie ein Geist, der ewig wiederkehrt, verfolgt sie uns für immer. Ist sie ein Geist aus Malewitschs wahrhaft revolutionärem Gemälde Weiß auf Weiß? Hat unsere Zeit überhaupt noch etwas damit zu tun? Wie dem auch sei, Nina Fischer und Maroan el Sani fangen unseren Zeitgeist ein.

Notiz
1. John Ralston Saul, The Collapse of Globalism and the Reinvention of the World, Atlantic, London 2005.
 
 

Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani

xoo - ex ovo omnia
Berlin, 2006

Under a white concrete dome, that resembles an egg half buried in the ground, one finds the big conference-hall of the Oscar Niemeyer building in Paris.
The white concrete dome is the site of an unusual experiment: two actors in white protection suits are concentrating on lining up raw eggs on the white conference tables. The task requires a calm hand, great patience and an understanding of complex structures such as the architecture of an egg.
The performance resulted in a film and a series of photographs, which were made in 2005 at the headquarters of the “Parti Communiste Francais" in Paris. The building itself was designed by brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer in 1965 and was finished in 1980.
We were drawn to the building's futuristic shape which allows us to look into the future from the standpoint of the past. The construct reminds of the style of the new brazilian capital Brasilia - a science fiction utopia also created by Niemeyer.
 
 

Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani
xoo - ex ovo omnia
Berlin, 2006

Der Film und die Fotoserie sind 2005 im Sitz der 'Parti communiste français', in Paris entstanden. Das Gebäude wurde von dem brasilianischen Architekten Oscar Niemeyer, 1965 entworfen und bis 1980 fertiggestellt. Für uns ist das Gebäude interessant wegen seiner futuristischen Formgebung, die für uns eine Sicht auf die Zukunft aus der Vergangenheit darstellt. Entworfen in den 60er Jahren, ist es vergleichbar mit der Formensprache der von Niemeyer realisierten Stadt Brasilia, einer gebauten Science Fiction Utopie.
Unter einer weißen Betonkuppel, die aus der Draufsicht einem halb in die Erde eingelassenen Ei gleicht, liegt der große Konferenzsaal des Pariser Niemeyer Baus. Dies ist der Schauplatz für ein ungewöhnliches Experiment: Zwei Darsteller in weißen Schutzanzügen widmen sich im Konferenzsaal einer Konzentrationsübung: Beide versuchen eine Anzahl von rohen Eiern auf den Konferenztischen vertikal aufzustellen. Dazu bedarf es einer ruhigen Hand, großer Geduld und einem Verständnis für komplexe Strukturen, wie der Architektur eines Eies.