Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani  
 

Projects

Publications & Texts Curriculum Vitae Gallery Contact Imprint  
    Selected Catalogues        
    Texts          
               
     
     
  About the artwork
About the artists
Marc Glöde      
Between Space and Memory: The Cinematic Soundings
of Uncanny Spatial Atmospheres in -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin
Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier, Zurich, 2008   pdf
english      
  german      
Alexandra Ventura Corceiro      
Nina Fischer / Maroan el Sani, -273,15°C=0 Kelvin (Radio Solaris)
       
Monitoring, exhibition catalogue, 22nd Kassel Documentary Film and Video Festival, 2005    pdf english      
  german      
Kazunao Abe
East Berlin Radio Station
Radio Solaris / -273,15°C=0 Kelvin, exhibition catalogue, YCAM Japan, 2006
pdf
 
Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani
-273,15°C=0 Kelvin    pdf
 
 

Marc Glöde

Between Space and Memory: The Cinematic Soundings
of Uncanny Spatial Atmospheres in -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin


Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, catalogue, JRP-Rignier, Zurich, 2008

Examining the cinematic oeuvre of Nina Fischer and Maroan el Sani, one is immediately struck by two frames of reference in many of the cinematic projects that stand out almost continuously.
Firstly, the films by these two artists are frequently concerned with visualising urban architectural settings in order to address the parameters of a discourse on space which has shaped the 20th century. By repeatedly using cinema to approach architectural spaces of particular significance, they constantly raise questions about the production of meaning. In the process, they explore the architecture presented in terms of identity, history or memory. Their films are thus an occasion to continually examine supposedly familiar spaces. To that end, in Toute la mémoire du monde – Alles Wissen dieser Welt for example, they present the old Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris by means of long tracking shots; the Palace of the Republic in Berlin by means of a cinematic installation in Palast der Republik – Weißbereich, and, in their project The Rise, the architectural reality of a neighbourhood in Amsterdam undergoing radical change.
Secondly, Fischer and el Sani repeatedly make reference to examples from the history of film that stand out for a particularly heightened effort to come to terms with questions of cinematic space. In Toute la mémoire du monde – Alles Wissen dieser Welt, they refer to the eponymous documentary film by Alain Resnais from 1956. In their photographic project L’Avventura senza fine, they focus on the spaces of Italian Neorealism by seeking out Lisca Bianca, one of the Lipari Islands, from Antonioni’s L’Avventura. Finally, in Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway, they reconstruct Tarkovsky’s famous film Solaris as a ride on Tokyo’s urban motorway.
Fischer and el Sani dedicate themselves to these themes again in -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin. In the process, however, they impressively condense these efforts to come to terms with such precedents. The architectural focus of the film is the broadcasting centre of the German Democratic Republic in East Berlin, which is still considered to be one of the outstanding examples of East German architecture in terms of its design and technological facilities, but was simply left vacant for a long period of time after German reunification, despite being fully functional. This site, which in the German Democratic Republic days was the point of departure for both ideological strategies and cultural life, became an intangible, emptied place within just a few months – a space resembling an uncanny, spookily abandoned spaceship whose only connection to social reality was through memory and projection.
The cinematic reference point for the work -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin is, as in Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway, Andrei Tarkovsky’s Solaris. Both in Tarkovsky’s film and that of Fischer and el Sani, one is struck by how the line of narrative development has dissolved from a logical cinematic plot, which usually moves from action to action. Both rooms are no longer concerned with, as Gilles Deleuze puts it, representing a space, but rather with conceiving it in images. The endless roaming in these empty spaces is thus scarcely released into a central plot. As a result, the supposed protagonists in the image recede ever more into the background, and the space itself becomes the actual experience. This experience, as Deleuze emphasises, ‘is in fact the clearest aspect of the modern voyage. It happens in any-space-whatever – marshalling yard, disused warehouse, the undifferentiated fabric of the city […] It is a question of undoing space, as well as the story, the plot or the action.’1 If Tarkovsky’s film and that of Fischer and el Sani are examined in this context, an interesting difference emerges: whereas in Solaris there is a protagonist moving through an abandoned space station, confronted in perplexing ways with his own past and memory, this component is lacking in the film by Fischer and el Sani. Although we encounter hallucinations like a woman appearing and disappearing, there is no protagonist presented. This causes a fundamental shift, since the focus moves away from the memories of the film character; Kelvin is no longer the main character in a film, but rather a state, an atmosphere.
Fischer and el Sani thus challenge the viewer to come to terms with a complex interplay of several spaces. It is about the cinematic interweaving of pictorial space, represented architectural space and the site of the film itself (the cinema). It is precisely this last aspect that becomes tangible in -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin, because it is not a classical film in the sense of a single projection, but a double projection, which makes it more a cinematic installation, picking up on the tradition of expanded cinema. This work by Fischer and el Sani thus thematises questions about meditating on urban spaces, not only on a visual level but also through a discourse on the space of the film itself by means of its formal setting. More than that, in terms of a fundamental understanding of space in the dynamic field of relationships between film and architecture, the film raises the question of how the relationship between the pictorial space, the architectural space and the conceptual space can be conceived.
Within the context of this cinema the viewer no longer feels at ease to give in entirely to the phantasmagorical potential of film. Rather, the viewer is challenged to come to terms with the spatial conditions of the parallel projections. The mental movement, or oscillation, between these various aspects of space which are crucial to the film connects and distances the viewer in equal measure from the unusual spaces of the apparatus. This challenges us not only to furnish the cinema ‘like a home’ but also to grasp several principles of the unhomely. As Freud has already demonstrated, ‘the uncanny or unheimlich is rooted […] in the environment of the domestic, or the heimlich, thereby opening up problems of identity around the self, the other, the body and its absence: thence its force in interpreting the relations between the psyche and the dwelling, the body and the house, the individual and the metropolis.’2
For -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin, that means making the otherwise concealed dynamics of spatial thinking recognisable and hence available in the cinema. It is therefore only logical that Fischer and el Sani ultimately depart from the traditional ‘black box’ with this work. In the exhibition Radio Solaris/-273,15°C = 0 Kelvin in 2005 at the Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media in Japan, their film became an installation beyond the classical cinema space. There the work could be experienced as a series of spiralling video screens on which images from Tarkovsky’s Solaris, Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway and -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin were spatially juxtaposed and could thus be woven together in new ways. Following the thread of the screens, one entered into a spatial vortex and ultimately ended up experiencing an effect that was so important to a figure like Hitchcock, who named one of his most important films after it: Vertigo. Rather than further consolidating and cementing a specific understanding of space, Fischer and el Sani catapult the viewer out of the cinema to grapple with the movement of an open form with new questions and spatial dynamics. These questions have to be raised again over and over when thinking in spaces.

Notes
1. Gilles Deleuze, The Movement-Image, vol. 1 of Cinema, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Barbara Habberjam, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 2001, p. 208.
2. Anthony Vidler, The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern Unhomely, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1992, p.10.

 
 

Marc Glöde

Zwischen Raum und Erinnerung: Die filmischen Auslotungen
unheimlicher Raumatmosphären in -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin


Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani - Blind Spots, Katalog, JRP-Rignier, Zürich, 2008

Betrachtet man das filmische OEuvre von Nina Fischer und Maroan el Sani, so fällt auf, dass es zwei auftretende Referenzrahmen in vielen filmischen Projekten gibt, welche geradezu kontinuierlich hervorstechen:
Zum einen beschäftigen sich die Filme der beiden Künstler anhand der Visualisierung von urbanen und architektonischen Settings immer wieder mit den zentralen Parametern eines das 20. Jahrhundert prägenden Raumdiskurses. Durch ihre fortwährenden filmischen Annährungen an architektonische Räume von besonderer Signifikanz werfen sie mit Beständigkeit Fragen hinsichtlich einer Erzeugung von Bedeutung auf. Sie untersuchen dabei die präsentierten Architekturen auf Aspekte wie Identität, Geschichte oder Erinnerung. Ihre Filme sind insofern Anlass, vermeintlich bekannte Räume immer wieder auf ein Neues zu betrachten. Beispielsweise die alte Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris in Toute la mémoire du monde – Alles Wissen dieser Welt, den Palast der Republik in Berlin in Palast der Republik – Weißbereich oder einen Stadtteil von Amsterdam im Umbruch in The Rise.
Zum anderen nehmen Fischer und el Sani immer wieder Bezug auf historische Positionen der Filmgeschichte, die sich insbesondere durch eine verstärkte Auseinandersetzung mit Fragen des filmischen Raums auszeichnen: So beziehen sie sich in Toute la mémoire du monde – Alles Wissen dieser Welt auf den gleichnamigen Dokumentarfilm von Alain Resnais aus dem Jahr 1956. In ihrem fotografischen Projekt L’Avventura senza fine fokussieren sie die Räume des italienischen Neorealismus, indem sie die Liparische Insel Lisca Bianca aus Antonionis L’Avventura aufsuchen. Und in Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway schließlich re-inszenieren sie eine Autofahrt über die Stadtautobahn Tokios aus Tarkowskijs bekanntem Film Solaris.
Auch in -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin widmen sich Fischer und el Sani wieder diesen Themen. Dabei verdichten sie die Auseinandersetzungen jedoch auf eindrucksvolle Weise. Architektonischer Fokuspunkt des Films ist diesmal das Rundfunkzentrum der DDR in Ost-Berlin, welches bis heute in Bezug auf seine Architektur und technische Ausstattung als eines der herausragenden Gebäude ostdeutscher Architekturpositionen gilt, das nach der Wiedervereinigung von DDR und BRD trotz voller Funktionstauglichkeit für lange Zeit dem Leerstand preisgegeben war. Dieser Ort, der zur Zeit der DDR Ausgangspunkt sowohl ideologischer Strategien wie ebenso kulturellen Lebens war, wurde innerhalb weniger Monate zu einem ungreifbaren, entleerten Ort. Ein Raum, der eher einem unheimlichen, geisterhaft verlassenen Raumschiff glich, der sich nunmehr nur noch über die Erinnerung und Projektion in einer gesellschaftlichen Realität verhandelte.
Der filmische Bezugspunkt der Arbeit -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin ist wie in Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway Andrej Tarkowskijs Solaris. Sowohl bei Tarkowskij als auch bei Fischer und el Sani fällt dabei auf, dass sich hier die logische Entwicklungslinie einer filmischen Handlung von Aktion zu Aktion aufgelöst hat. Es geht in beiden Arbeiten nicht mehr darum, wie Gilles Deleuze sagt, einen Raum zu repräsentieren, sondern vielmehr ihn in Bildern zu denken. Das endlose Herumstreifen in leeren Räumen entlädt sich somit kaum in eine tragende Handlung. Dadurch treten vermeintliche Protagonisten im Bild immer mehr in den Hintergrund und der Raum selbst wird zum eigentlichen Erlebnis. Dieses, so kann man mit Deleuze betonen, ist „tatsächlich das Eindeutigste an der modernen Wanderung: sie findet im beliebigen Raum statt – einem Rangierbahnhof, einem aufgegebenen Depot, Löchern im urbanen Gewebe […]. Es geht darum, […] den Raum ebenso wie die Fabel, die Intrige oder die Aktion auseinanderzunehmen, sie zu zerstören.“1 Betrachtet man in diesem Zusammenhang den Film Tarkowskijs und den Film von Fischer und el Sani, so zeigt sich eine interessante Differenz: Während sich bei Tarkowskij noch ein Protagonist durch eine entleerte Raumstation bewegt, um auf irritierende Art mit seiner eigenen Vergangenheit und Erinnerung konfrontiert zu werden, fehlt diese Komponente im Film von Fischer und el Sani. Auch hier sehen wir zwar Trugbilder wie eine erscheinende und verschwindende Frau – doch es gibt keinen inszenierten Protagonisten. Dadurch tritt eine fundamentale Verschiebung ein: denn die Auseinandersetzung bewegt sich weg von den Erinnerungen einer filmischen Person. Kelvin ist hier nicht mehr die Hauptfigur eines Films, es ist vielmehr ein Zustand, eine Atmosphäre.
Fischer und el Sani fordern somit eine Auseinandersetzung des Betrachters mit einem komplexen Zusammenspiel mehrerer Räume heraus. Es geht hier um die filmische Verwebung von Bildraum, repräsentiertem architektonischem Raum und dem Ort des Filmes selber (dem Kino). Gerade dieser letzte Aspekt wird mit -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin auf interessante Art greifbar, da dieser kein klassischer Film im Sinne einer einfachen Projektion ist, sondern bereits durch seine Doppelprojektion mehr den Charakter einer filmischen Installation erhält, welche an eine Tradition des Expanded Cinema anschließt. Die Arbeit von Fischer und el Sani thematisiert somit also nicht nur auf der Bildebene Fragen hinsichtlich eines Nachdenkens über städtische Räume, sondern auch durch ihr formales Setting bereits einen Diskurs über den Raum des Films selbst. Mehr noch – der Film eröffnet hinsichtlich eines grundlegenden Raumverständnisses im dynamischen Bezugsfeld von Film und Architektur die Frage, wie sich das Verhältnis von Bild-, Denk- und architektonischem Raum fassen lässt?
Vor diesem Hintergrund kann sich der Betrachter im Kino keineswegs mehr ohne weiteres heimisch fühlen und gänzlich dem phantasmagorischen Potenzial des Films hingeben. Vielmehr ist er zu einem Auseinandersetzungsprozess mit den räumlichen Bedingungen der parallelen Projektion aufgefordert. Diese geistige Bewegung zwischen den diversen, für den Film maßgeblichen Aspekten des Raumes, dieses Oszillieren, verbindet und distanziert den Betrachter gleichermaßen von diesen ungewohnten Räumen des Dispositivs. Die Arbeit fordert auf, sich im Kino nicht nur ‚häuslich einzurichten‘, sondern einige Grundzüge des Unheimlichen zu begreifen. Denn wie bereits Freud ausgeführt hat, „ist das Unheimliche […] im Bereich des Häuslichen bzw. des Heims angesiedelt und eröffnet damit Identitätsprobleme um das Selbst, um den Anderen, den Körper und dessen Abwesenheit; daraus erwächst die Kraft, die Beziehungen zwischen Psyche und Wohnung, Körper und Haus, Individuum und Metropole zu deuten.“2
Für -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin heißt dies, die sonst verdeckten Wirkungsdynamiken von räumlichem Denken im Kino erkennbar und somit verfügbar zu machen. Dass Fischer und el Sani mit dieser Arbeit schließlich auch die Black Box verlassen, ist da nur konsequent. Ihr Film wird außerhalb des klassischen Kinoraums in der Ausstellung Radio Solaris/-273,15°C = 0 Kelvin im Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media (Japan 2005) zu einer Installation: hier ist die Arbeit als eine Reihe spiralförmig angeordneter Videoscreens erfahrbar, auf der sich die Bilder aus Tarkowskijs Solaris, Tokyo Metropolitan Expressway und -273,15°C = 0 Kelvin räumlich nebeneinander anordnen und damit neu verweben lassen. Folgt man dieser räumlichen Bewegung der Leinwände, so gerät man in einen Raumstrudel und endet somit schließlich bei einem Effekt, der für keinen Geringeren als Hitchcock so wichtig war, dass er einen seiner wichtigsten Filme nach ihm benannte: den Vertigo. Anstatt also ein Raumverständnis weiter zu festigen und einzubetonieren, katapultieren Fischer und el Sani die Auseinandersetzung mit der Bewegung aus dem Kino heraus in eine offene Form mit neuen Fragestellungen und verunsichernden Raumdynamiken. Diesen gilt es sich bei einem Denken in Räumen immer wieder neu zu stellen.

Notizen
1. Gilles Deleuze, Das Bewegungs-Bild, Kino 1, Frankfurt am Main 1990, S. 278 f.
2. Anthony Vidler, unHEIMlich. Über das Unbehagen in der modernen Architektur, Sternberg Press, Frankfurt/New York 2001, S. 14.

 
 

Alexandra Ventura Corceiro

Nina Fischer / Maroan el Sani, -273,15°C=0 Kelvin (Radio Solaris)
Monitoring, exhibition catalogue, 22nd Kassel Documentary Film and Video Festival, 2005

A cautious camera movement through the deserted building of former East Germany’s broadcasting centre and a fundamental score mould the first impression of Nina Fischer’s and Maroan el Sani’s double projection. Two apparently identical records of the building’s interior are shown which move through it simultaneously. The score supports the images. It seems as though one were exploring an area in trance that remains strangely mysterious. Small differences between the two records reinforce an air of mystery. One projection shows the institution’s rooms and gangways, as they can be seen today. They are imbued with a charm of days long gone. Here is embedded East Germany’s history, where it was melted into the ether. The second projection shows the same rooms. Images out of the work of the painter Gerhard Richter were added to the camera movement by Fischer and el Sani. With these nearly fleeting intrusions, it appears as though something would have been there, that can now only be hinted to, that are fading memories. One is perpetually tempted to compare.
In fact, Fischer and el Sani refer to the film “Solaris” from 1972 by Andrej Tarkowski, in which the protagonist Kelvin is ordered to destroy a space station, constructed for a planet’s scientific observation. At his arrival Kelvin walks around the station that seems uninhabited and notices the station’s scientists strange behaviour – a mixture of anxiety and secrecy. In the course of the story, Kelvin becomes a victim of his own past, which is now, like a plague, turning real. The planet influences the scientists in the space station and appropriates their memories. It reproduces a world of the past as well as of desires and hopes. In the end one can’t tell anymore what is real and what is constructed. The planet uses the power of the men’s desires and fantasies letting them become an unpredictable quantity. A factor that can’t be calculated in any of the society’s cost-effectiveness estimates. The passengers become a threat to themselves and others because their subjective reality is not the objective reality anymore.
In Fischer’s and el Sani’s work the spectator is left to use his own historical knowledge about the former nation and utopia as an additional input. It’s Gerhard Richter’s pictures that write themselves like a Fata Morgana into the broadcast company’s history. Similar to the film where Kelvin’s dead wife is resurrected all of a sudden and he tries to kill her, Fischer and el Sani have Richter’s pictures burned down in the end. What is the reality that fades away here, and what is the reality that remains?

 
 

Alexandra Ventura Corceiro
Nina Fischer / Maroan el Sani, -273,15°C=0 Kelvin (Radio Solaris)
Monitoring, exhibition catalogue, 22nd Kassel Documentary Film and Video Festival, 2005

Eine behutsame Kamerafahrt durch das menschenleere Gebäude des ehemaligen Rundfunkzentrums der DDR in Berlin und eine tragende Filmmusik prägen den ersten Eindruck der Doppelprojektion von Nina Fischer und Maroan el Sani. Zu sehen sind zwei scheinbar identische Aufzeichnungen des Inneren des Gebäudes, die zeitgleich denselben Verlauf darbieten. Die Musik unterstützt die Bilder. Es ist, als würde man in Trance eine Gegend erkunden, die sonderbar rätselhaft bleibt. Kleine Unterschiede in den Aufnahmen verstärken den Eindruck des Geheimnisvollen. Die eine Projektion zeigt die Korridore und Räume der Anstalt, wie sie heute zu sehen sind. In ihnen steckt der Charme alter Zeiten. Darin verankert ist die Geschichte der DDR, wie sie durch den Äther ging. Die zweite Projektion zeigt dieselben Räume. Der Kamerafahrt haben Fischer und el Sani Bilder aus dem Werk des Malers Gerhard Richter hinzugefügt. Durch den fast flüchtigen Eingriff wirken die Aufnahmen, als wäre vorher etwas gewesen, was nun nur noch angedeutet werden kann, oder wie verblassende Erinnerung erscheint. Immerzu verleiten die Bilder zum Vergleich.
Tatsächlich nehmen Fischer und el Sani Bezug auf den 1972 entstandenen Film „Solaris“ von Andrej Tarkowski. Dort bekommt die Hauptfigur Kelvin den Auftrag, eine Raumstation zu zerstören, die zur wissenschaftlichen Observation eines Planeten errichtet wurde. Bei seiner Ankunft beschreitet Kelvin die Station, die unbelebt wirkt und bemerkt, dass die ansässigen Forscher sich seltsam benehmen, ängstlich wirken und etwas zu verbergen versuchen. Im Laufe der Erzählung wird Kelvin Opfer seiner eigenen Vergangenheit, die nun wie eine Plage zur Realität wird. Der Planet beeinflusst die Forscher in der Raumstation und eignet sich deren Erinnerungen an. Er reproduziert eine Welt des Vergangenen, aber auch der Wünsche und Hoffungen. Am Schluss ist nicht mehr zu trennen, was Realität und was Konstruktion ist. Der Planet nutzt die Kraft der Wünsche und Fantasien der Menschen und lässt sie zu einer unberechenbaren Größe werden. Ein Faktor, der in keiner gesellschaftlichen Kosten-Nutzen-Kalkulation berechnet werden kann. Die Insassen werden zu einer Bedrohung für sich und andere, weil ihre Realität nicht mehr der Wirklichkeit entspricht.
In der Arbeit von Fischer und el Sani bleibt es dem Betrachter überlassen, sein geschichtliches Wissen über eine vergangene Nation und vergangene Utopie als ein ergänzendes Element einzubringen. Nicht zuletzt sind es Gerhard Richters Bilder, die sich wie eine Fata Morgana in die Geschichte des Rundfunksenders einschreiben. Ähnlich wie im Film, in dem Kelvins verstorbene Frau plötzlich wieder zum Leben erwacht und er sie versucht zu töten, lassen Fischer und el Sani die Bilder Richters am Ende verbrennen. Was ist die Realität, die hier verblasst und was die Wirklichkeit, die bleibt?

 
 

Kazunao Abe

East Berlin Radio Station
Radio Solaris / -273,15°C=0 Kelvin, exhibition catalogue, YCAM Japan, 2006

In a socialist country, the radio station was, so to speak, an experimental device in the city, in which nature, the world, and our existence were kept frozen and reproduced by the media through sounds only. To everyone's surprise, in then state-of-the-art institution given all available technologies as a recording machine of the materialistic ideology as the social realism, an enormous space like an orchestra hall for recording was designed to hang in midair to avoid noise. Now the building itself is the remains of the past, and almost no one uses this empty space. How is this building viewed in a historical context of Berlin, a leading city in the EU economic block as the capital of Germany having experienced the fall of the Wall and the reunification of Germany?
In this media-architectural installation, Nina Fischer / Maroan el Sani focus on Andrej Tarkovsky's film "Solaris" (1972, the original novel by Polish writer Stanislaw Lem) that strongly reflects the thought of the Communist block in the Cold War times, while, by contrast, trying to attain the motif of universal human existence. There, the ruins of the "Radio Station" of East Germany and the probe spaceship of "Solaris" are overlapped in the installation. Here arises a question about whether or not the two (one is an unknown celestial body "Solaris" that materializes the marked traces through all human memories, and the other is today's society reproducing all existences through information and media) are actually far apart. The "Radio Station" was designed to use the technology to reproduce the real existences through only sounds without vision, as the ultimate technology. Here, Nina Fischer / Maroan el Sani try carefully to gain insight into some hope and crisis in the contemporary times is, just as the approaches to the unachievable are applied and translated into media technologies.

Creative designed media installation
This media-architectural installation constitutes a space composed of ten multi-faceted projections linked sideways in a spiral form. The installation basically consists of a camera travel through the empty spaces of the radio station. It is a continuous shot, which is divided into 8 screens. On each screen another room can be discovered. The films are screened in a unit of 8 alternating twin projections. That means Fischer / el Sani filmed the traveling through the radio station twice. One time just the abandoned spaces and the second time with slight interventions inspired by Tarkovsky's film "Solaris". The objects that appear in Tarkovsky's film "Solaris" and the motifs from natural science and art-history, for example the Gerhard Richter painting "Frau, eine Treppe hinabsteigend", are quoted into fascinating and elegant moving images mixed with the space from the social realism. They show practical reality, but at the same time, work as a fictitious factory producing realness obtained through memories. The documents and memory-added documents begin simultaneously, and as they get entangled, they start to regenerate subtle differences.
The music and sound design for 10 pairs of speakers have been created by Robert Lippok, Berlin. It is a traveling sound, that guides the visitor through the installation.
In addition, Nina Fischer / Maroan el Sani especially produced for the YCAM exhibition a new video double projection for their project "Radio Solaris", in which the viewers can compare the scenes of the metropolitan highway ride in the vicinity of Akasaka in Tokyo filmed by Andrej Tarkovsky around in 1970 that appear in "Solaris" and those in current Tokyo filmed from the same angle in the same size. The highway, futuristic architecture of the 70ies seems old and not up to date anymore in the film-remake of today.

 
 

Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani

-273,15°C=0 Kelvin

The zero grade of the Kelvin scale is absolute zero, the lowest scale of temperature. After the ‘nernstschen’ heat theorem the absolute zero of -273,15 °C = 0 Kelvin is unattainable. We find ourselves in the year 2004. 32 years after Andrej Tarkowskij’s Science Fiction film „Solaris“. Tarkowskij’s hero Kelvin is at it again, but this time not to liquidate the space station Solaris but rather, the former GDR broadcasting station in Berlin, Nalepastrasse. As in „Solaris” a mysterious disorder in the station leads to dissolution, and via its power idealistic fantasies, memories and trauma materialize as „guests”. In this double projection, Kelvin’s subjective gaze glides slowly through the emptiness. Simultaneously, the perceived is the imagined, the past is the present. If the future did not transpire as it should have, does it yield the inverse conclusion that in the future the past can be corrected at will? Both arenas, the space station Solaris as well as the GDR broadcast station Nalepastrasse bear witness to a failed Utopia.

 
 

Nina Fischer, Maroan el Sani

-273,15°C=0 Kelvin

The zero grade of the Kelvin scale is absolute zero, the lowest scale of temperature. After the ‘nernstschen’ heat theorem the absolute zero of -273,15 °C = 0 Kelvin is unattainable. We find ourselves in the year 2004. 32 years after Andrej Tarkowsky’s science fiction film „Solaris“. Tarkowsky’s hero Kelvin is at it again, but this time not to liquidate the space station Solaris but rather, the former GDR broadcasting station in Berlin, Nalepastrasse. As in „Solaris” a mysterious disorder in the station leads to dissolution, and via its power idealistic fantasies, memories and trauma materialize as „guests”. In this double projection, Kelvin’s subjective gaze glides slowly through the emptiness. Simultaneously, the perceived is the imagined, the past is the present. If the future did not transpire as it should have, does it yield the inverse conclusion that in the future the past can be corrected at will? Both arenas, the space station Solaris as well as the GDR broadcast station Nalepastrasse bear witness to a failed Utopia.